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Linguistic, Literary, and Manuscript History with The Digital Grave, by Leah Pope Parker

Leah Pope Parker, University of Southern Mississippi

Resource

Digital Grave

Discussion Questions

  • What perception of death and dead bodies is suggested by this poem?
  • What kind of reading practices are suggested by the addition of the final three lines of the poem? Why would a reader add these lines?
  • Why would a poem like this be added to a manuscript that otherwise contains no poetry, and is primarily a collection of homilies?

Further Reading

Kitson, Peter R. “Old English Dialects and the Stages of the Transition to Middle English.” Folia Linguistica Historica: Acta Societatis Linguisticae Europaeae, vol. 11, no. 1–2, 1992, pp. 27–87.

Siebert, Eve. “A Possible Source for the Addition to The Grave.” ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 19, no. 4, Sept. 2006, pp. 8–16.

Thompson, Victoria. Dying and Death in Late Anglo-Saxon England. The Boydell Press, 2004.

Treharne, Elaine M. Living through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020–1220. Oxford University Press, 2012.

To Cite this Page

Parker, Leah Pope, “Linguistic, Literary, and Manuscript History with The Digital Grave,” Middle Ages for Educators, July 22, 2020. Accessed [date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/videos/linguistic,-literary,-and-manuscript-history-with-the-digital-grave,-by-leah-pope-parker

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