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Women of 1000 AD, by Meg Hyland

Meg Hyland

MSc, University of Edinburgh

Discussion Questions

  1. What are the benefits for medievalists of learning about what was going on in the Americas at the same time? What are the drawbacks of bringing the Americas under the “medieval” umbrella? Consider the existing archaeological periodizations of the Americas as well as the effects on Native peoples today.
  2. What does historical reconstruction art offer that more traditional academic output might not? What compromises must an artist make that a historian writing an article or book might not have to think about or might not accept?
  3. How are medieval women and historical women of colour represented in art you’ve been exposed to, whether in public art, pop culture or textbooks?
  4. Looking through the stories on this website, did anything surprise you about the options women had open to them or the roles women could play in their societies?

Links

Women of 1000 AD website

Further Reading

Sheridan, Sara. Where Are the Women? A Guide to an Imagined Scotland. Historic Environment Scotland (2019).

Clados, Christine. Reconstructing the Pre-Columbian World. University of Wisconsin Madison (2004).

Global Middle Ages Project

Sources for images

Godlewski, Włodzimierz, “Bishops and Kings. The official program of the Pachoras (Faras) Cathedrals”, Between the Cataracts. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference for Nubian Studies Warsaw University 27 August-2 September 2006. Part 1. Main Papers (2008), pp. 263-282.

Korpisaari, Antti, and Martti Pärssinen, Pariti: The Ceremonial Tiwanaku Pottery of an Island in Lake Titicaca. Helsinki: Finnish Academy of Science and Letters (2011).

To Cite This Page

Hyland, Meg. “Women of 1000 AD,” Middle Ages for Educators, July 18, 2020. Accessed[date]. /http://middleagesforeducators.com/course-materials/women-of-1000-ad-by-meg-hyland/