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Course Materials MAA Webinar Online Teaching Tool Talk

Reading Together: Using Perusall to Gloss the Online Text, by Shawn Hill

Shawn Hill, Instructional Technologist

Fordham University

Tools and Repositories

Perusall

Gallica, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, digitized manuscripts

Sources Used for this Demo

Presentation Slides

To cite this page:

Hill, Shawn. “Reading Together: Using Perusall to Gloss the Online Text,” Middle Ages for Educators, July 14, 2020. Accessed [date].

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Asynchronous Digital Activities Course Materials Meet a Medieval Source Videos

Linguistic, Literary, and Manuscript History with The Digital Grave, by Leah Pope Parker

Leah Pope Parker, University of Southern Mississippi

Resource

Digital Grave

Discussion Questions

  • What perception of death and dead bodies is suggested by this poem?
  • What kind of reading practices are suggested by the addition of the final three lines of the poem? Why would a reader add these lines?
  • Why would a poem like this be added to a manuscript that otherwise contains no poetry, and is primarily a collection of homilies?

Further Reading

Kitson, Peter R. “Old English Dialects and the Stages of the Transition to Middle English.” Folia Linguistica Historica: Acta Societatis Linguisticae Europaeae, vol. 11, no. 1–2, 1992, pp. 27–87.

Siebert, Eve. “A Possible Source for the Addition to The Grave.” ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 19, no. 4, Sept. 2006, pp. 8–16.

Thompson, Victoria. Dying and Death in Late Anglo-Saxon England. The Boydell Press, 2004.

Treharne, Elaine M. Living through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020–1220. Oxford University Press, 2012.

To Cite this Page

Parker, Leah Pope, “Linguistic, Literary, and Manuscript History with The Digital Grave,” Middle Ages for Educators, July 22, 2020. Accessed [date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/videos/linguistic,-literary,-and-manuscript-history-with-the-digital-grave,-by-leah-pope-parker

For feedback, please tweet to @ParkerChronicle

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Asynchronous Digital Activities Course Materials Online Teaching

Women of 1000 AD, by Meg Hyland

Meg Hyland

MSc, University of Edinburgh

Discussion Questions

  1. What are the benefits for medievalists of learning about what was going on in the Americas at the same time? What are the drawbacks of bringing the Americas under the “medieval” umbrella? Consider the existing archaeological periodizations of the Americas as well as the effects on Native peoples today.
  2. What does historical reconstruction art offer that more traditional academic output might not? What compromises must an artist make that a historian writing an article or book might not have to think about or might not accept?
  3. How are medieval women and historical women of colour represented in art you’ve been exposed to, whether in public art, pop culture or textbooks?
  4. Looking through the stories on this website, did anything surprise you about the options women had open to them or the roles women could play in their societies?

Links

Women of 1000 AD website

Further Reading

Sheridan, Sara. Where Are the Women? A Guide to an Imagined Scotland. Historic Environment Scotland (2019).

Clados, Christine. Reconstructing the Pre-Columbian World. University of Wisconsin Madison (2004).

Global Middle Ages Project

Sources for images

Godlewski, Włodzimierz, “Bishops and Kings. The official program of the Pachoras (Faras) Cathedrals”, Between the Cataracts. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference for Nubian Studies Warsaw University 27 August-2 September 2006. Part 1. Main Papers (2008), pp. 263-282.

Korpisaari, Antti, and Martti Pärssinen, Pariti: The Ceremonial Tiwanaku Pottery of an Island in Lake Titicaca. Helsinki: Finnish Academy of Science and Letters (2011).

To Cite This Page

Hyland, Meg. “Women of 1000 AD,” Middle Ages for Educators, July 18, 2020. Accessed[date]. /http://middleagesforeducators.com/course-materials/women-of-1000-ad-by-meg-hyland/


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Course Materials MAA Webinar Tool Talk

Christine de Pizan Through Storymaps, by David Joseph Wrisley

David Joseph Wrisley

NYU Abu Dhabi

Sources Referenced in this Video

Slides

ArcGIS Storymaps

Storymap.js

Dataset of places mentioned in Christine de Pizan

Interactive map

Selected storymaps for medievalists

The Road to Agincourt (Chatzis, Edinburgh) (military history)

Sul camino del Rinascimento (EIPACA di Manosque) (art production) 

London’s lost river: the Tyburn (MOLA) (geo-archeology)

The Garden of Earthly Delights – Hieronymus Bosch (art history) 

Game of Thrones : Arya’s Journey (cultural studies) 

On mapping Christine de Pizan 

Wrisley, D.J. (2018). The Literary Geographies of Christine de Pizan, Approaches to Teaching Christine de Pizan, ed. Andrea Tarnowski. MLA, 156-163.

Some Starting Points for Medieval Spatial Datasets 

Digital Atlas for Roman and Medieval Civilization https://darmc.harvard.edu/data-availability 

Morreale, L. (2019). Exploring Place in the French of Italy, 1st Edition (Version Omeka Classic, CartoDB). Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2562276 

Wrisley, D. J. (2015). The Literary Geographies of Christine de Pizan (geo-data) [Data set]. Approaches to Teaching Christine de Pizan. Modern Language Association. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.35350

A General Rubric for Academic Web-Based Writing:

Wrisley, D.J. (2020, July). Rubric for Academic Web-based Writing (Version 1.0). Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3932709

On (Medieval) Culture and Mapping

Lethbridge, E., Hartman, S. (2016). Inscribing Environmental Memory in the Icelandic Sagas and the Icelandic Saga Map, PMLA 131.2, 381-391.

Kinniburgh, M.C. (2018). Spatial Reading: Digital Literary Maps of the Icelandic Outlaw Sagas, Digital Medievalist 11(1).

Petrulevich, A., Backman, A. Adams, J. (2019). Medieval Macrospace Through GIS: The Norse World Project Approach. The Cartographic Journal, 57.1.

Wrisley, D.J. (2017). Locating Medieval French: or Why We Collect and Visualize the Geographic Information of Texts, Speculum 92, no. S1, S145-S169.

Wrisley, D.J. (2020). Exploring the Geographies of Froissart’s Chroniques, H-France Salon, 12:8, #26.

On Storymapping and Pedagogy 

Dickinson, S., Telford, A. (2020). The Visualities of Digital Story Mapping: Teaching the ‘Messiness’ of Qualitative Methods Through Mapping Technologies. Journal of Geography in Higher Education.

ESRI. Story Maps and the Digital Humanities   https://collections.storymaps.esri.com/humanities/

Sinton, D.S. (n.d.) Mapping. Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models and Experiments. https://digitalpedagogy.mla.hcommons.org/keywords/mapping/.

Wrisley, D.J. (2018). Mapping in the Digital Liberal Arts: Models, methods, futures, AMICAL webinar.

To cite this page

Wrisley, David Joseph. “Christine de Pizan Through Storymaps.” Middle Ages for Educators, July 15, 2020. Accessed [date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/course-materials/christine-de-pizan-through-storymaps-by-david-joseph-wrisley/

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Course Materials MAA Webinar Online Teaching

Thinking about Pedagogy as Medievalists, by Leah Shopkow

Leah Shopkow

Indiana University, Bloomington

Sources Referenced in this Video

Slides

Annotated Bibliography

Shopkow, Leah. “Annotated Bibliography: Thinking about Pedagogy as Medievalists,” Middle Ages for Educators, [date accessed].

Poster Assignment

Indiana University, Bloomington. (2016). Poster Prompt and Assessment Rubric for Final Assignment. History B204: Medieval Heroes. Bloomington, Illinois: Leah Shopkow.

To cite this page

Shopkow, Leah. “Thinking about Pedagogy as Medievalists.” Middle Ages for Educators, July 14, 2020. Accessed [date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/online-teaching/thinking-about-pedagogy-as-medievalists,-by-leah-shopkow/

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Course Materials Tool Talk

Domesday Book Data Analysis using Excel and PASE, by Jennifer Edwards

Jennifer C. Edwards

Professor and Chair of History, Manhattan College

Tools and Repositories

The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England 

Voyant

slack

Excel

Sources Used for this Demo

Manhattan College. (2020). Assigment: Domesday Book Analysis. History 337: Britain to 1688. New York, New York: Jennifer C. Edwards.

Domesday Book at the Internet History Sourcebook:

Further Reading:

Domesday book online: http://www.domesdaybook.co.uk/contents.html

Domesday Book at the National Archives

To cite this page:

Edwards, Jennifer. “Domesday Book Data Analysis using Excel and PASE, by Jennifer EdwardsMiddle Ages for Educators, July 12, 2020. Accessed [date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/uncategorized/domesday-book-data-analysis-using-excel-and-pase-by-jennifer-edwards/

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Course Materials Meet a Medieval Source Videos

Early Transmission of the Black Death, by Hannah Barker

Hannah Barker, Arizona State University

Primary Sources

Petition from the Residents of Caffa, 1347

Mussis, Gabriele de’. “The Arrival of the Plague.” In The Black Death, ed. Rosemary Horrox, 14-26. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 1994.

Further Reading: Primary Sources

Bartsocas, Christos. “Two Fourteenth Century Greek Descriptions of the ‘Black Death’.” Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 21 (1966): 394-400.

Heyligen, Louis. “The Plague in Avignon.” In The Black Death, ed. Rosemary Horrox, 41-45. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 1994.

Dols, Michael. “Ibn al-Wardi’s Risalah al-naba’ ‘an al-waba. A Translation of a Major Source for the History of the Black Death in the Middle East.” In Near Eastern Numismatics.  Iconography, Epigraphy, and History:  Studies in Honor of George C. Miles, ed. Dickran Kouymijian and George Miles, 443-455. Beirut: American University of Beirut, 1974.  

Muisis, Gilles. “The Plague Seen from Tournai.” In The Black Death, ed. Rosemary Horrox, 45-47. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 1994. 

The Report of the Paris Medical Faculty, October 1348.” In The Black Death, ed. Rosemary Horrox, 158-163. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 1994.

Villani, Giovanni. “Chronicle.” In John Aberth, The Black Death: The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, 19-20. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.

Discussion Questions

  1. In this petition, the inhabitants of Caffa ask for money, soldiers, and a bishop. Why do they need each of those things? Why do they turn to the doge of Genoa for help?
  2. At the time when this petition was written, had anyone in Caffa shown symptoms of plague? If so, which symptoms? If not, why did the petition mention “an endless plague of death”?
  3. Compare what this source says about the early transmission of the Black Death with the account of Gabriele de’ Mussis. Based on what you know about modern medical research on plague transmission, which version makes more sense? Based on what you know about medieval ideas about disease and contagion, which version would make more sense to medieval readers?
  4. Compare what this source says about the early transmission of the Black Death with another source from the list of Further Reading – Primary Sources. How are the two accounts similar? How are they different? What do you think the differences imply?

Further Reading – Seconday Sources

Barker, Hannah. “Laying the Corpses to Rest: Grain Embargoes and the Early Transmission of the Black Death in the Black Sea, 1346-1347.” Speculum (forthcoming 2021). Preprint on BodoArXiv, May 2, 2020. 

Dols, Michael. The Black Death in the Middle East. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979. 

Green, Monica, ed. Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death. In The Medieval Globe 1, no. 1 (2014). Accessed May 7, 2020. 

Schamiloglu, Uli. “The Impact of the Black Death on the Golden Horde: Politics, Economy, Society, Civilization.” Golden Horde Review 5, no. 2 (2017): 325-343.

Spyrou, Maria, Marcel Keller, Rezeda Tukhbatova, et al. “Phylogeography of the Second Plague Pandemic Revealed through Analysis of Historical Yersinia pestis Genomes.” Nature Communications 10/4470 (2019), 1-13.

Varlik, Nükhet. Plague and Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean World: The Ottoman Experience, 1347-1600. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.

To Cite This Page

Barker, Hannah, “Early Transmission of the Black Death,” Middle Ages for Educators, May 7, 2020. Accessed[date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/uncategorized/early-transmission-of-the-black-death,-by-hannah-barker/

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Course Materials

A Medieval Plague Lesson Plan, by Merle Eisenberg

Merle Eisenberg, SESYNC, Co-Founder The Middle Ages for Educators

Teaching medieval diseases and pandemics, especially the plague, has become, not surprisingly, more central to courses on medieval history over the last few months. Luckily, the medieval studies community includes many generous and talented colleagues eager to share their expertise and resources. Below you will find some open-access material the Middle Ages for Educators has collected including background material, primary sources, and short lessons on reactions to plague. We also offer more background reading on plague and pandemics in our resources page.

Background on the Plague

You can find some great background about the biology and history of the plague on the Infectious Historians podcast episode entitled “Plagues in Human History,” which can also be found on most major podcasting networks. If your students want to know more about the two major outbreaks, the Justinianic Plague and the Black Death, there are additional episodes on each of them as well. This podcast is co-hosted by Merle Eisenberg and the website has links to additional readings, some of which are open-access.

Primary Sources

Jessica Goldberg at UCLA has provided us with her own translation and commentary of the famous 1348 Ordinances of Pistoia. The Ordinances were issued upon the arrival of the plague early in the Spring of 1348 (March or April) and are the city’s response about a month later. Her wonderful translation also includes artwork that really give a unique idea of what was happening in Pistoia when the plague struck.

Merle Eisenberg also uploaded a video, sources, and questions for teaching the Justinianic Plague (c. 541-750 CE). He has provided a mini lesson for teaching students about what its impact may (or may not) have been.

Reactions to Plague

Dan Smail’s video and lesson plan about the effect of the Black Death on a single woman and her family in Marseille is definitely a great way to discuss the individual impact of this disease. It is one thing to think about the mortality rate of a pandemic or its impact on governments, but Smail offers a micro-history that demonstrates how the diseases devastated families, through various other viewpoints such as legal history, gender, and disability studies. He tells a powerful story of the past that has striking resonances for the present.

Abigail Agresta has also written a wonderful, short blog post on the Infectious Historians website that offers a way into how medieval people responded to the outbreak of the Black Death. Like many of us today, there were only so many options that people living in the medieval period had and she offers a source on them plus a short discussion. Her blog post could be a useful interactive exercise to do with your students as another way to teach the outbreak of the Black Death.

To Cite this Page

Eisenberg, Merle, “A Medieval Plague Lesson Plan,” Middle Ages for Educators, May 4, 2020. Accessed[date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/uncategorized/a-medieval-plague-lesson-plan/

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Course Materials Meet a Medieval Source Videos

The “Lais” of Marie de France, by Kathy Krause

Kathy Krause, University of Missouri Kansas City

Editions and Translations

Online:

Scholarly edition and translation into modern French (most recent of several available):

Nathalie Koble, Mireille Séguy ed & trans., Lais bretons (XIIe-XIIIe siècles): Marie de France et ses contemporains (Paris: Éditions Honoré Champion, 2018).

There are two excellent English translations (not freely available on-line, but with many inexpensive used copies available via on-line booksellers):

  • Gly Burgess and Keith Busby, trans. The Lais of Marie De France With Two Further Lais in the Original Old French (New York: Penguin Books, 2011) (ebook and paperback).
  • Robert W. Hanning and Joan M. Ferrante, trans., The Lais of Marie de France, (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1995) (paperback).

Digitized manuscripts of the Lais:

The only manuscript with the prologue and all twelve of the (known) lais:

There are four other manuscripts with one or more lais (two with Marie’s collection of fables, known as the Ysopet (i.e. Aesop)):

Discussion Questions for specific lais:

Lanval

1. One way to understand the construction of the lai is to examine the situation of the protagonist, Lanval.  What is Lanval’s problem at the beginning of the lai ?  in the middle ?  at the end?

2. What does the lai tell us about Lanval (e.g. descriptions by the narrator or by other characters)? How does the text show Lanval behaving?  Does he behave like his description?  (Be able to point to elements in the text to defend your answer.)

3. Analyze the scene where Lanval meets the fée (fairy).  Where does it occur?  How is the fée described?  How does Lanval react?  Etc.

4. How is the queen described/presented?  (What is she doing at the beginning of the episode?  How does she react when she sees him?  How does she interact with Lanval?)

5. What are the “stages” of Lanval’s trial?  What exactly is he accused of doing?  Do you know any (famous) similar stories?

Laüstic

A. Background:

1. How were marriages decided in the Middle Ages (for the wealthy)? Who chose the husband/wife? with what criteria ? What kinds of results might you expect (for either spouse) under such a system?

B. You and the characters

1. How do you react to each of the characters? Is your reaction positive, negative, ambivalent? 

2. For each character, make a list of the qualities and actions that explain your reaction.

3. For each character, explain how the narrator characterizes them (what expressions are used in the text). For whom does the narrator have sympathy? In other words, who does the narrator portray positively? negatively?  Try to distinguish between a reaction based on your moral system, your ideas about what is right or correct, and how the story actually presents each of the characters.

C. Medieval literature often uses symbols to suggest feelings and ideas (modern literature does too, of course). What symbolic value does each of the objects take on in the lai?

  • 1. the wall
  • 2. springtime
  • 3. the nightingale’s song
  • 4. the bloodstain
  • 5. the “tiny vessal” (Shoaf) or “coffret” (Mason)

Power Point of this talk

Downloadable PDF

To Cite this Page

Krause, Kathy. “The Lais of Marie de France,” Middle Ages for Educators, April 10, 2020. Accessed[date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/uncategorized/the-lais-of-marie-de-france-by-kathy-krause/

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Course Materials Meet a Medieval Source Videos

Teaching Portugal’s Age of Expansion and Exploration, by Ross Karlan

Ross Karlan, Georgetown University and the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery

Primary Source Links:

Discussion Questions:

1. How do Zurara and Caminha represent the “other”  in the colonial space? Are there similarities or differences between how they describe Brazil/Brazilians and Guinea/Guineans?

2. In Luis de Camões’ Lusiads, what is the role of genre? How does genre shape Camões’ authorship or audience reception? Are there moments where Camões addresses this directly?

Further reading:

Blackmore, Josiah. Moorings: Portuguese Expansion and the Writing of Africa. University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Russell, Peter Edward. Prince Henry “the Navigator”: A Life. Yale Univ. Press, 2001.

Russell-Wood, A. J. R. The Portuguese Empire, 1415-1808: A World on the Move. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.

Williams, Jerry M. “Pero Vaz de Caminha: The Voice of the Luso-Brazilian Chronicle.” Luso-Brazilian Review, vol. 28, no. 2, 1991, pp. 59–72.

To Cite this Page

Karlan, Ross. “Teaching Portugal’s Age of Expansion and Exploration,” Middle Ages for Educators, April 9, 2020. Accessed[date]. http://middleagesforeducators.com/videos/teaching-portugals-age-of-expansion-and-exploration-by-ross-karlan/